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Beloved Packs an Emotional Punch

11 Aug

Reviewed by Nicholas Linnehan
Have you loved someone so much that you thought you’d die without them? In facet, the very air you breathed depended on their existence? If you can relate to this unhealthy gut- wrenching need then you’ll relate to Beloved brought to us by the Scandinavian American Theater Company. This play, written by Lisa Langseth, has great emotional depth and force, but lacks many logistical details that leave us confused. As a result, this play could be a powerhouse but the red flags it raises detract from its overall impact.

Katerina is in a rotten suburb and yearns for a world filled with culture and refinery. In her current predicament she is living with her blue colored boyfriend Matthias, who has no interest in art, society and the finer things in life. When Katerina lands a job as a receptionist in a concert hall, she meets Adam, an illustrious composer who has everything Katerina seemingly wants. Eventually the two have an affair. Yet, Adam is married with a baby. This does not stop the two of them and Katerina develops a blinding need for Adam and she can not live without him. She learns the hard way that all that glitters is not gold.

In this one woman show Ellinor Dilorenzo does a remarkable job capturing the sick emotional incessant need that Katerina feels for Adam. Her pain is palpable and heart breaking to witness. As a general rule, I do not go to see one person shows. I tend to find them tedious to listen to. Watching one person drone on and on for nearly 90 minutes can feel like an eternity and lacking action. But Dilorenzo gives us a performance that is anything that is boring. We follow her harrowing heart ache fully and are with her every step of the way.

Unfortunately, the script is not fully fleshed out. There are many details missing that take us out of the world of the play. For example, we are never quite sure where we are. It seems like we are in Europe, but there are some specific American references that make us unsure of where this story is happening. Throughout the play Katerina is putting things in a suitcase, but we never know where she is going or leaving from? The last location of the play is set in her grandma’s apartment and she says Adam can now visit her any time. But where is the grandma and if the grandma is dead how is the unemployed Katerina living there? All of these loose ends add up and eventually take us out of the world of the play. There is an unnecessary and melodramatic event in the middle of the play that is jarring and not believable. It is a rather big plot twist, yet  is dealt with in less than five minutes, which  makes us wonder why it is there in the first place?

This is a shame because DiLorenzo does her best to keep us emotionally invested and she mostly succeeds. Her talent is undeniable, but the scripts flaws are too big to ignore. This is a shame because Beloved packs an emotional punch that lands strongly. Yet, like a house without a strong foundation, it can only hold so much before it completely collapses.

Beloved plays now through August 18, 2018 at Theater Row 410 W 42nd St. http://www.SATCNYC.ORG

Comfort Women Sits Uncomfortably

4 Aug

Reviewed by Nicholas Linnehan

 

There is nothing worse than going to a show and within the first minute you know what the entire plot is going to be. True, in classical works this is expected, but in a new musical like Comfort Women this knowledge sucks the air out of the play before it even officially begins. While understanding the topic of the piece can be informative, the play itself has to have something unexpected to happen in order to grab the audience. Unfortunately, this musical had few surprises in it which made it feel too familiar, which downplayed its impact significantly.

The show opens with some captions written across a screen, which gives too much away. Korean women were captured by the Japanese during WW II and forced to be sex slaves. The women bond together The play follows Goeun, one of the Korean women enslaved. She eventually meets Minsick, a Korean soldier who is serving in the Japanese army The two of them create a love story that is unnecessary and cliché. You can probably guess the rest of the story line as I did.

There are a few significant problematic moments in this show. One has to deal with the choreography. The actors seemed to be uncomfortable doing it and some were always a beat behind, throwing off the intended synchronicity. Most of the time the dancing seemed out of place and like it was just forced into the piece. The exception is when the actress playing Soonja sings “Butterfly in Moonlight”. During the number the ensemble uses white flowing fabric to make a picture of the girl as a butterfly. This moment was executed well and had intention,unlike most of the other choreography

Another detrimental area was the fight sequences. The stage combat was so fake that it made them seen laughable and took us out of the world of the play. Instead of enhancing the horrific nature of abuse that these women endured, it detracted from the situation and removed its efficacy. A more sophisticated approach to this area is needed to make it believable.

What saves this play is its talented cast, Abigail Cholarader plays Goeun and acts her butt off. She, almost single handedly, saves the shows from utter despair. Her piercing voice shine through and we can listen to her forever. She brings a sense of honesty that breaks through all the chaos unfolding around her. On the other hand, while not the strongest vocalist, Matthew Bautista adds much needed comedy to this dark world. What he may lack as a singer, is more than made up for in his acting chops.

While Comfort Women definitely has the potential to be a powerhouse, in its current state it is more like an attempt to replicate of Miss Saigon. There is definitely a story here that needs to be told, but it needs more originality before reaching its crucible.

Comfort Women plays now through August 9, 2018 at the Peter J sharp Theater 416 W 42nd St. http://www.comfortwomenmusical.com/

http://www.comfortwomenmusical.com/

The Pattern at Pendarvis is Simply Perfect!

20 Jul

Reviewed by Nicholas Linnehan

 

How many times throughout history have minorities made significant contributions, only to be forgotten about because of prejudice and intolerance? Such is the case of Edgar and Rob, two gay men who were responsible for keeping Pendarvis running in Wisconsin during the 1930’s. They restored cottages and preserved the original architecture of Cornish-built limestone houses that were falling apart in Mineral Point, Wisconsin. Their heroic efforts were responsible for saving this lead mining town from certain extinction. The Pattern at Pendarvis by Dean Gray reveals their true story of charity and love. Until now, Rob and Edgar’s story has largely been an omission in historical books because of their lifestyle. In the 1930’s two gay men were seen as degenerates, nothing else. But thankfully, now, we can truly understand and appreciate what these to men did for the town and celebrate their love story.

In today’s theater so much emphasis is put into staging and spectacle, that we forget the profundity of simple connection between actors and audience and storytelling. Placed on a basic set with three main chairs, three men share their stories with us. When Rich, a gay author in his thirties, approaches Edgar he makes it clear that he is interested in interviewing Edgar and telling all of Edgar’s remarkable tale; everything from the saving of the town to the more intimate details of his relationship to his lover Rob. However, Norm, the conservative president of the Pendarvis board, wants the homosexual details left out of the interview. Forces clash as the interview continues.

What makes this an astounding production is the connection between Lawrence Merritt, Edgar and Gregory Jensen, Rich. The men are separated by 60 years and throughout the play they develop a deep understanding and respect for one another. Their newly formed companionship is beautifully poignant. Merritt is engaging, endearing, and forthright in his convictions about his 44 year long relationship with Rob. There is power in his stillness and we do not ever get tired of listening to his unbelievable story. He is every bit as compelling as Jensen, whose sincerity is never fake. The two have breath-taking chemistry. We believe every word Jensen says and are forever grateful that this character, based on a real person, took the time and care to unearth this unheard story. David Murray Jaffe plays Norm with panache and we love to hate him. A job well done!

These men, Edgar and Rob did not get the credit they deserved for their efforts in the 1930’s. Like many influential people, they were robbed of their place in history because of intolerance. But luckily, we have people today who are trying to change that. I love going to the theater and learning about something important that really happened. This is a definite must see and another perfect example of theater that matters!

The Pattern at Pendarvis plays now through Aug 5, 2018 at HERE 145 sixth ave. www.spincyclenyc.com/index.php/theater/397-pendarvis

Grabbing P***y Gives us a lot to think About

19 Jul

Reviewed by Gregor Collins

 

Longtime Performance Artist Karen Finley’s current visits to the Laurie Beechman Theatre for staged readings based on her new book GRABBING PUSSY are not for the faint of heart—so that should have you seeing it. What to expect? I’ll let Finley tell you: “Breathless cascades of poetry and prose that lay bare the psycho-sexual obsessions that have burst to the surface of today’s American politics.”

If this sounds a little esoteric, I’ll simplify it for you: She makes art out of news. And the art she makes is hard to ignore. In the tradition of Allen Ginsberg’s 1954 poem Howl, Finley’s rapid-fire meditations cover a milieu of up-to-the-minute affairs including Spade and Bourdain’s suicide, the separation of families at the border, and the #MeToo movement.

Since I assume you read these reviews to get an honest, unpretentious critique from a regular person, I’ll describe my experience like this: If you were to have been my guest last Sunday when I attended the performance, and in the first two minutes you wanted to see how I was feeling about it, you would have gotten a very decided eye-roll. But if you had checked in with me around minute ten, I would have been too unwittingly seduced by her lilting musings to have given you a response. That sentiment carried through to the end.

Grabbing Pussy runs every Sunday at 7pm from July 15 – 29, 2018 at The Laurie Beechman Theater (inside West Bank Cafe at 407 West 42nd Street), General admission is $22, or $35 which includes a signed book. To purchase
tickets, call 212-352-3101 or visit www.SpinCycleNYC.com.

 

 

Teenage DICKliciousness!

14 Jul

 

Reviewed by Nicholas Linnehan

Lots of time I go to theater and it is good. Rarely, do I see a piece that’s exceptional. This is the case in Teenage Dick written by Mike Lew. It was so good that I gave a standing ovation at the curtain call. It’s gripping and awe-inspiring showing us that Persons with Disabilities are just as talented as the able-bodied world. Produced by Ma-yi theatre this is an awesome show

Think Richard III but with high schoolers. In this version Dick, short for Richard, has Cerebral Palsy, and as a result is bullied all the time, Thus he schemes to become class president. He manipulates and lies like Richard does in Shakespeare’s play, but unlike Richard, Dick struggles with his deception versus him better side, especially when he meets Anne Margaret, who eventually develops real feelings for Dick. Dick’s humanity is present along with his evil parts. We see him contemplate between deciding which path, and ultimately what kind of man he wants to be, he should choose, which makes us like this creep as we see he has a honest component in his make up.. His trickery causes him to to lose his one ally Buck. a fellow disabled person confined to a wheelchair.

Now for the great part; the actors. Greg Mozgala gives a superb performance as Dick. He is maniacal, yet comical when he delivers his soliloquies to the audience. Yet, what makes Mozgala unforgettable is his inner conflict between love and his plan for revenge. It is palpable and breathtaking simultaneously. His ability to show his inner conflict is unparalleled and rivals that of any leading man out there today. I would not be surprised if he gets a nomination for his performance. Equally Impressive is Shannon Devido as Buck. This actor is on top of her game and delivers every time we see her. She is hysterical, delivering some of the funniest plays in the play. Another actor I must mention is Tiffany Villarim as Ann Margret. Her journey is unbelievable to watch. Her last speech brought tears to our eyes. Witnessing her harrowing demise, caused mainly because of Dick, is heart wrenching. She is phenomenal in her role and holds her own.

Needless to say this is a must see! The time flew by and I didn’t want it to end. I do not think I will ever forget seeing this production. Simply put, go see this show NOW! I would not be surprised if the rest of the run is sold out. We can only hope for an extended run. This is a perfect example of theater that matters.

Teenage Dick plays now through July 29, 2018 at the Public Theater, 425 Lafayette St http://www.ma-yitheatre.com.

Innit to Win it!

10 Jul

Reviewed by Gregor Collins

 

As an acute theatregoer I can’t help but form impetuous assessments about if what I’m being given in the very first moment feels “put on” or forced—in Colette Forde’s one-woman-play Innit, coming all the way from Ireland’s Limerick Fringe Festival to the Soho Playhouse from July 6 to August 5, there was, from my perspective, no deficiency of authenticity.

And Forde’s talent as an actor was cemented when her endearing grit kept circling around my head on the way home.

After beginning the show with footage of an arbitrary, irreverently sexualized music video set in a dingy warehouse starring Forde as the petulant Kelly Roberts, Roberts walks out from behind the video screen and bellows to the audience in her hard-nosed Irish brogue: “What am I doin’ ere’? Do I look like I need to see a psychiologist?”

The rest of the 55-minute play, set in 1990’s Manchester, chronicles a single session at her school’s “psychiologist” office, using us, the audience, to spew profanity-laced polemics about heartless classmates and boyfriends, her inattentive father, and her audacious mother who does absolutely horrible things like not even let her get her belly button pierced. In Roberts, Forde has crafted a kind of female Holden Caulfield, dramatizing her isolating teenage years with rebellious charm.

Forde also penned the script, which never really fully took us on the rollercoaster ride we wanted, and, aside from the final, affecting moments, we pined for more poignancy to offset the often one-note, acidic rants. In the end, though, Forde’s formidable stage presence made it worth the trip. I wouldn’t be surprised if headlining an Oscar-nominated indie film were in her future.

While touring Innit, Forde is writing another one-woman show, and going back to college in September to study ‘Youth and Community Work’.

Innit plays now through August 5, 2018 at Soho playhouse 15 Vandam St https://colette-forde.squarespace.com/.

Innit to Win it!

10 Jul

Reviewed by Gregor Collins

 

As an acute theatregoer I can’t help but form impetuous assessments about if what I’m being given in the very first moment feels “put on” or forced—in Colette Forde’s one-woman-play Innit, coming all the way from Ireland’s Limerick Fringe Festival to the Soho Playhouse from July 6 to August 5, there was, from my perspective, no deficiency of authenticity.

And Forde’s talent as an actor was cemented when her endearing grit kept circling around my head on the way home.

After beginning the show with footage of an arbitrary, irreverently sexualized music video set in a dingy warehouse starring Forde as the petulant Kelly Roberts, Roberts walks out from behind the video screen and bellows to the audience in her hard-nosed Irish brogue: “What am I doin’ ere’? Do I look like I need to see a psychiologist?”

The rest of the 55-minute play, set in 1990’s Manchester, chronicles a single session at her school’s “psychiologist” office, using us, the audience, to spew profanity-laced polemics about heartless classmates and boyfriends, her inattentive father, and her audacious mother who does absolutely horrible things like not even let her get her belly button pierced. In Roberts, Forde has crafted a kind of female Holden Caulfield, dramatizing her isolating teenage years with rebellious charm.

Forde also penned the script, which never really fully took us on the rollercoaster ride we wanted, and, aside from the final, affecting moments, we pined for more poignancy to offset the often one-note, acidic rants. In the end, though, Forde’s formidable stage presence made it worth the trip. I wouldn’t be surprised if headlining an Oscar-nominated indie film were in her future.

While touring Innit, Forde is writing another one-woman show, and going back to college in September to study ‘Youth and Community Work’.

Innit plays now through August 5, 2018 at Soho playhouse 15 Vandam St https://colette-forde.squarespace.com/.